Consortium for Energy Policy Research at Harvard
FELLOWS AND VISITING SCHOLARS

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A

Debisi Araba
Louis Bacon Environmental Leadership Fellow and Mason Fellow, Harvard Kennedy School MPA Student
Previously, Dr. Debisi Araba was the Technical Adviser on Environmental Policy and Personal Aide to the Honorable Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development in Nigeria. His current focus is on agricultural resilience. He recently co-
authored Nigeria’s National Agricultural Resilience Framework and leads global and national partnerships in the development
of climate smart strategies for the agricultural sector. Dr. Araba began his professional career with the Newcastle City Council in the UK, where he worked as a consultant and project manager on waste recycling and environmental policy. He is a respected and published academic who has presented his work at various conferences the world over. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographic Society and a member of the Nigerian Society of Engineers, International Solid Wastes Association and the Collaborative Working Group on Solid Waste Management in Low and Middle Income Countries. Dr. Araba has a BSc. degree in Physical Geography from the University of Ibadan, a M.Sc. degree in Clean Technology from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne and a Doctorate degree from the Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London, where his research focused on designing frameworks for incorporating evidence based research into environmental policy in developing countries.

Mauricio Arias
Giorgio Ruffolo Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, Harvard Kennedy School
ResearchTopic:International political economy, energy economics, and Euro- pean integration

Dr. Mauricio Arias’s work at Harvard is based at the Harvard’s Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology. His research aims at creating science-based linkages between the hydrological cycle, ecosystems, and society in order to promote sustainable management of water resources. He has studied physical, biological and chemical properties of freshwater eco-systems in Colombia, the United States, China, New Zealand, and most recently in Cambodia, where he carried out his doctoral research. Mauricio is investigat- ing the effect of hydropower operations in river flows and how hydrological alterations through the Amazon basin could be mitigated while maintaining electricity generation needs. He is contributing to the Initiative on Sustainable Development of the Amazon and its Surrounding Regions: The Interplay of Changing Climate, Hydrology, and Land Use led by Paul Moorcroft. Mauricio holds a Bachelor of Science (Magna Cum Laude) and a Masters of Engineering in Environmental Engineering Sciences from the University of Florida. He recently completed a PhD in Civil Engineering from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, where he was awarded UC’s International Doctoral Student Scholarship. Mauricio’s doctoral research focused on the Mekong River Basin, where he quantified the impacts of hydropower development and climate change on the hydrology and ecology of the Tonle Sap, Southeast Asia’s largest lake and one of the most productive freshwater fisheries on the planet. His faculty host is Paul Moorcroft.

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Megan Bailey
Pre-doctoral Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD Student in Public Policy
Research Topic: Greenhouse gas policies

Megan Bailey seeks to evaluate the environmental efficacy and economic efficiency of policy options for curbing greenhouse gas emissions, such as carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems, at both national and international levels. Additionally, she is interested in the non-market valuation of ecosystem services, particularly those at risk of being lost via ecological collapse. Megan holds a BS in ecology, evolution, and organismal biology; a BA in art; and an MA in international relations from California State University, Fresno. She is the recipient of a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

Patrick Behrer
Pre-doctoral Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD Student in Public Policy

Patrick Behrer holds an AB in economics from Harvard University and a MS in resource economics from Colorado State University. While an undergraduate at Harvard, Patrick won the Harvard Environmental Economics Program's 2010 James M. and Cathleen D. Stone Prize for the Best Senior Thesis. He also spent a year in New Zealand as a Fulbright Fellow studying environmental policy. His research interests lie in the valuation of ecosystem services and the institutional or programmatic design necessary to fully integrate the value of these services into a modern economy. Additionally, he is interested in land use policy and creative mechanisms for financing conservation projects, particularly in developing countries.

Nuno Bento
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School (in residence through December 2015)
Research Topic: Emergence and development of energy technologies

Nuno Bento studies the emergence and development of energy technologies. He
has been working at Center for Socioeconomic and Territorial Studies at the University Institute of Lisbon on research supported by the Portuguese Research Council on the transfer and diffusion of energy technologies in Portugal. He was previously a Postdoctoral Researcher at International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis, Austria.
Nuno holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Grenoble, France.

Jan Peter Bergen
Visiting Fellow, Program on Science, Technology, and Society, Harvard Kennedy School (in residence through Fall 2015)
Research Topic: The role of technological reversibility in responsible experimentation with nuclear energy technologies

Jan Peter Bergen is a PhD candidate in Philosophy of Technology at Delft University of Technology and a visiting fellow at the Harvard STS Program. His research in Delft is part of a larger project on experimentation with new technologies in society, with him focusing on the role of technological reversibility in responsible experimentation with nuclear energy technologies. In his work, Jan combines insights from sociology, innovation studies, and STS, as well as philosophical pragmatism and 20th century phenomenology.

Marie-Abèle Bind
Ziff Environmental Fellow, Harvard University Center for the Environment
Research Topic: Causal inference methods to investigate the role of temperature on health

Marie-Abèle Bind is an environmental biostatistician interested in health effects from environmental exposures.
Marie-Abele earned a MSc. in Engineering (Specialization in Energy and Environment) in 2007 at one of France’s Grandes Ecoles. She then received a MSc. in Environmental Health in a one-year intensive program at the Cyprus Institute associated with the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). In 2014 she received a dual Doctor of Science (ScD) degree in Environmental Health and Biostatistics from HSPH. Marie’s dissertation focused mainly on developing and applying methods to investigate the role of epigenetics in air pollution health effects. While working toward her ScD degree, Marie-Abele graduated from HUCE’s Graduate Consortium on Energy and Environment and received a MSc. in Biostatistics from HSPH.
Marie-Abele is working with Donald Rubin of the Department of Statistics to explore how temperature increases due to climate change will impact cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in susceptible populations. Most epidemiological studies have focused on associations between temperature and health outcomes rather than causal effects. Marie-Abele plans to estimate causal temperature health effects. Within the field of causal inference, mediation analysis has become a valuable tool to examine pathways, especially in epidemiological research. She will extend previous causal effects derivations to settings with mortality outcomes and formalize mediated effects. Moreover, there is a recent interest for epigenomics data to examine new pathways. She will also examine the causal temperature effect on epigenome wide data in order to identify new biological mechanisms.

Jonathan Buonocore
Program Leader, Climate, Energy, and Health, Center for Health and the Global Environment
Research topic: Evaluating the impacts, benefits, and tradeoffs of technology and policy choices in energy, transportation, agricultural practices, and climate change mitigation and adaptation.

Presently, Jonathan is working with the Climate, Energy, and Health team to better understand the health and environmental risks of hydraulic fracturing in Pennsylvania’s Marcellus Shale, and also researching the health and climate benefits of renewable energy, energy efficiency, and other carbon mitigation methods. By exploring the tradeoffs between different technologies, methods of pollution control, and policy options, Jonathan and the team will develop research-based recommendations designed to help policymakers, investors, leaders of industry, and residents of affected areas make informed decisions that will support public health and a healthy environment. Jonathan is also working with Center faculty to estimate the health impacts of particulate exposure due to fires in Indonesia, including particulate matter that crosses international boundaries.

Lizzie Burns
Research Fellow, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Research Topic: Geoengineering

Lizzie Burns is a Research Fellow at Harvard, where she works for Professor David Keith on issues related to geoengineering. Lizzie is passionate about working on issues of climate change, and previously spent a summer interning for the White House Council on Environmental Quality. She also previously worked for the nonprofit organization, Opportunity Nation. Lizzie earned a Master in Public Policy degree from the Harvard Kennedy School and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Williams College.

 

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Rohit Chandra
Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD Student in Public Policy
Research Topic: State capitalism in the Indian coal industry: 1960-2005

Rohit Chandra's research focuses on the history, evolution, and dynamics of energy markets in India. In particular, he looks at the multiple roles of the state as owner, regulator, consumer, and planner. His dissertation focuses in particular on the Indian coal industry, constructing a state capitalism framed history of the industry from 1960-2005. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a degree in electrical engineering and has worked at the Centre for Policy Research in New Delhi and the Center for Advanced Study of India in Philadelphia.

Kathryn Chelminski
Predoctoral Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Effectiveness of clean energy governance in addressing barriers to policy and technology diffusion in developing countries

As a PhD candidate at the Graduate Institute, Kathryn Chelminski examines the effectiveness of clean energy governance in addressing barriers to policy and technology diffusion in developing countries.
Her current research focuses on the impact of fossil fuel subsidy reform on the competitiveness of geothermal energy in Indonesia. Prior to joining the Belfer Center, Kathryn was a doctoral researcher at the Center for International Environmental Studies at the Graduate Institute and the Centre de Recherches Internationales at Sciences Po.

Cuicui Chen
Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD Candidate in Public Policy
Research Topic: Industrial organizations, environmental economics, microeconomic theory 

Cuicui Chen is interested in firms’ behavior under market-based regulations. In her dissertation she is investigating how electric generating companies have learned over time to comply with (or better yet, take advantage of) the Acid Rain Program, the first large-scale market-based environmental regulation in U.S., and how that learning process might have been affected by Public Utilities Commissions' regulation and deregulation. Cuicui is also using insights from microeconomic theory in the study of international climate agreements. She graduated from Tsinghua University in 2010 with a Bachelor's degree in Environmental Engineering, and from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2012 with a Master of Science degree in Technology and Policy.

Jinqiang (JC) Chen
Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Sustainability Science, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Risks in Chinese electricity markets

Jinqiang (JC) Chen earned his PhD from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in 2015. His PhD research focused on dynamics of the East Asian summer monsoon in various climates. Prior to that, he obtained two bachelor degrees in Civil Engineering from the Politecnico di Torino and the Harbin Institute of Technology in 2011. At the Belfer Center, he will explore risks in Chinese electricity markets and recommend mitigation strategies that will facilitate China's energy transition into a green future.

Christopher Cote
Belfer IGA Student Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Christopher Cote, a Master in Public Policy 2016 candidate at Harvard Kennedy School, is a Belfer Center International and Global Affairs (BIGA) Student Fellow.
Cote's interests are in energy, climate, and foreign policy. Chris spent last summer as a Rosenthal Fellow working on energy diplomacy in the Bureau of Energy Resources at the Department of State. During his first year at Harvard Kennedy School, Chris worked with the Program on Negotiation and the Energy Technology Innovation Program. Before school he spent time at the Inter-American Dialogue, the Office of the Secretary of Defense, BrazilWorks, Fulbright's English teaching program in Brazil, and the Council on Foreign Relations. He has also done independent work on nuclear power safety and security.

Tim Cronin
NOAA Climate and Global Change Fellow, Harvard University Center for the Environment
Research Topic: Arctic atmospheric convection in a warmer world

Tim Cronin is a climate scientist interested in the interactions between clouds, sea ice, and severe storms in a warmer Arctic.
Tim earned a BA in Physics from Swarthmore College in 2006, and received a PhD in Climate, Physics, and Chemistry from MIT in June 2014. His dissertation research used simple column models of the atmosphere, interacting with a land surface, to explore a collection of problems in climate science. One of the papers he published developed a theory for the sensitivity of near-surface temperatures to changes in land surface properties, which is relevant for understanding how anthropogenic land use and land cover change may have resulted in past and future climate change. Tim has also worked on trying to understand why it rains preferentially over islands in the tropics, and whether geologic changes around Indonesia have implications for climate changes over the past 3-5 million years. During the 2011-2012 academic year, he was a Martin Society Fellow for Sustainability, and his work has also been funded by the NSF.
As an Environmental Fellow, Tim is working with Eli Tziperman of the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences on the interaction between clouds and sea ice in the Arctic, in climates that are warmer than present. His project has application to warmer climates of the distant past, as well as climates of the future. Tim will also explore the potential for the formation of hurricane-like storms over a warmer Arctic ocean that has lost much of its sea ice; such storms would be highly relevant to the impacts of climate change on both human and natural systems in the future Arctic.

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Sebastian D. Eastham
NOAA Climate and Global Change Fellow, 2015-2017

Sebastian David Eastham is an environmental scientist interested in the transport and impacts of pollutants and trace species over long distances through the atmosphere.
Sebastian received an MEng in aerospace and aerothermal engineering from Cambridge University in 2011, with a dissertation on nuclear fuel cycle optimization. Between 2011 and 2015 he studied at MIT's Laboratory for Aviation and the Environment, working on a PhD in aeronautics and astronautics dedicated to the human health impacts of high altitude emissions. This work included integration of stratospheric chemistry and physics into the Harvard GEOS-Chem atmospheric model, development of a health impacts model and assessment of the long-term surface air quality and UV radiation impacts of both aviation and proposed sulfate aerosol geoengineering techniques. He received his PhD from the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 2015.
Sebastian will be working with Daniel Jacob in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences to investigate the failure of Eulerian atmospheric models to reproduce observed synoptic-scale transport of pollution in narrow plumes and quasi-horizontal layers. Although a typical response to low model fidelity has been to increase global grid resolution and thereby incur significant computational cost, Sebastian is exploring the theoretical causes for enhanced numerical dissipation in these atmospheric structures. The goal of this research is to identify new and efficient modeling techniques capable of accurately reproducing and maintaining the observed high chemical gradients over global distances without requiring prohibitively fine global grid resolutions. By enabling accurate representation of long-distance pollutant transport and chemistry, Sebastian hopes to improve model accuracy with regards to intercontinental impact attribution.

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Fabio Farinosi
Giorgio Ruffolo Doctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Vulnerability of hydropower generation to changes in climate, hydrology and land use in Brazil

Fabio Farinosi’s fellowship research is based at the Harvard’s Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology. He is a doctoral student in the Science and Management of Climate Change Programme at Ca’ Foscari University in Italy. His research assesses the impacts of global changes in climate, combined with regional changes in land use and hydrology in the Amazon, on flood risk and hydropower generation in Brazil. The project aims to provide policy makers with a better understanding of the expected future impacts and enhance long-term mitigation strategies. Fabio is contributing to the collaborative Initiative on Sustainable Development of the Amazon and its Surrounding Regions: The Interplay of Changing Climate, Hydrology, and Land Use, led by Professor Paul Moorcroft.

Nathan Fleming
Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD Student in Public Policy
Research Topic: Understanding how access to natural resources affects national security and potentially drives conflict

Nathan Fleming is interested in natural resource economics and security studies. Specifically, he is interested in understanding how access to natural resources affects national security and potentially drives conflict. He also has a related interest in manufacturing firm strategies for securing critical materials. He began his career as a mechanical engineer. He designed aircraft engines at General Electric for five years before returning to school to earn SM degrees in mechanical engineering and Technology & Policy at MIT.

Benjamin Franta
Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Resilience strategies for climate change impacts

Benjamin Franta is a predoctoral research fellow at the Belfer Center's Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program focusing on the development of general resilience strategies for preparing for climate change impacts. He is a PhD Candidate in Applied Physics at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and a graduate of Harvard's Graduate Consortium on Energy and the Environment. He is a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Research Fellow, a USAID Global Research and Innovation Fellow, and a member of the Harvard Graduate School Leadership Institute. He has degrees in physics, mathematics, archaeological science, and applied physics from Coe College, the University of Oxford, and Harvard.

 

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Todd Gerarden
Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD Student in Public Policy
Research Topic: Renewable energy investment incentives and energy efficiency

Todd's interests lie at the intersection of energy and environmental economics, public economics, and industrial organization. His current research focuses on energy efficiency and government incentives for renewable energy investment. Todd obtained a BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Virginia in 2010. He is a recipient of the EPA STAR Fellowship and a Truman Scholar. Before beginning doctoral studies, Todd worked at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and Resources for the Future.


Gianfranco Gianfrate
Giorgio Ruffolo Research Fellow in Sustainability Science, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Innovation financing, carbon finance, and the integration of environmental footprint metrics in corporate valuation

Gianfranco Gianfrate writes and researches on topics related to innovation financing, carbon finance, and the integration of environmental footprint metrics in corporate valuation.
Prior to joining the Belfer Center, Gianfranco was an Assistant Professor of Finance at Bocconi University (Milan, Italy) and a manager at Hermes Investment Management (London, UK). Gianfranco is a research affiliate of the Aspen Institute and of SovereigNET at Tufts Fletcher School. He holds a PhD in Business Administration from Bocconi University.


Anna P. Goldstein
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Movement of clean energy technology from the lab to the marketplace

Anna Goldstein’s research at the Belfer Center focuses on ways that governments, universities, and corporations can accelerate the movement of clean energy technology from the lab to the marketplace.
Anna received her PhD in 2014 in Chemistry with an emphasis in Nanoscale Science and Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, where she investigated nanomaterials for use in energy applications, such as artificial photosynthesis and electrochemical energy storage.


Yue Guo
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Project on Managing the Atom, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: The social acceptance of new energy technology innovation

Yue Guo is a postdoctoral research fellow with the Project on Managing the Atom. He received his PhD degree in in Public Management from Tsinghua University, China, in July 2015.
His research mainly focuses on the social acceptance of new energy technology innovation. In his dissertation, he analyzed the factors influencing the public acceptance of nuclear power technology and the roles of government policies and public participation. He previously conducted research on local acceptance of wind power in China with Harvard Kennedy School Assistant Professor Laura Diaz Anadon, Former Science, Technology, and Public Policy Fellow Jun Su, and Former Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group Fellow Peng Ru.

 

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Zhiyong Han
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Public policy related to funding science and technology innovation

Zhiyong Han received an MSc. in Management Science from University of Science and Technology of China, an MA in Public Policy and Public Administration from University of York in the United Kingdom, and a PhD in Management Science from Chinese Academy of Science. As a professor of the National Nature Science Foundation of China, he is now focusing on public policy of funding science and technology innovation.


Olli Heinonen
Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Olli Heinonen’s research and teachings include nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament, verification of treaty compliance, enhancement of the verification work of international organizations, and transfer and control of peaceful uses of nuclear energy.
Before joining the Belfer Center in September 2010, Olli Heinonen served 27 years at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna. Heinonen was the Deputy Director General of the IAEA, and head of its Department of Safeguards. Prior to that, he was Director at the Agency’s various Operational Divisions, and, as inspector, including at the IAEA’s overseas office in Tokyo, Japan, Heinonen led teams of international investigators to examine nuclear programmes of concern around the world and inspected nuclear facilities in South Africa, Iraq, North Korea, Syria, Libya and elsewhere, seeking to ensure that nuclear materials were not diverted for military purposes. He also spearheaded efforts to implement an analytical culture to guide and complement traditional verification activities. He led the Agency’s efforts to identify and dismantle nuclear proliferation networks, including the one led by Pakistani scientist A.Q. Khan, and he oversaw its efforts to monitor and contain Iran’s nuclear programme.

Prior to joining IAEA, he was a Senior Research Officer at the Technical Research Centre of Finland Reactor Laboratory in charge of research and development related to nuclear waste solidification and disposal. He is co-author of several patents on radioactive waste solidification.

Heinonen is the author of several articles, chapters of books, books, in publications ranging from the IAEA and nuclear non-proliferation issues, to regional nuclear developments. His writings and interviews have be published in various newspapers and magazines including: Foreign Policy, The Wall Street Journal, the Guardian, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Arms Control Today, Der Spiegel, Le Monde, the Helsingin Sanomat, the New York Times, the Mehr news, Die Stern, the Haaretz, the New Statesman, the Washington Post, the BBC, and Time. His policy briefings have been published by the Belfer Center, the Atlantic Council, the Nautilus Institute, the Institute for Science and International Security, the Nonproliferation Policy Education Center,  the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and the Carnegie Endowment.

Olli Heinonen studied radiochemistry and completed his PhD dissertation in nuclear material analysis at the University of Helsinki.


Evan Herrnstadt
Kernan Brothers Environmental Fellow, 2015-2017

Evan Herrnstadt is an economist interested in the design and performance of energy and natural resource markets.

Evan earned a BS in economics and political science from the University of Iowa in 2006.  After graduating, he was a research assistant at Resources for the Future in Washington, DC, where he worked on energy and climate policy.  He moved to the University of Michigan in 2009, where he earned a MA in economics in 2011, and a PhD in economics in 2015.  His doctoral research primarily focused on modeling and estimating the effects of environmental requirements on how firms compete for government contracts.

As an Environmental Fellow, Evan will work with Ariel Pakes of the Department of Economics on the implications of common contracting practices in the oil and natural gas drilling industry.  He will also develop improved empirical tools for the analysis of data from natural resource auctions.  These insights and tools will improve our understanding of important institutions governing energy production, and help to predict the response of the energy industry to climate and environmental policies.


Mun Ho
Visiting Scholar, Harvard China Project, SEAS
Visiting Scholar, Institute for Quantitative Social Science
Research Topic: Economic effects of environmental policies in the U.S. and China

Mun Ho is an economist in the Harvard China Project’s integrated research of the environmental, health and economic impacts of emission control options in China. He has a PhD in economics from Harvard University and is also a visiting scholar at Resources for the Future in Washington, DC. He and others at the China Project have developed an economic growth model of China to study the impact of environmental policies and carbon taxes, and studied household energy demand patterns. He also works with Dale Jorgenson of the Economics Department in studying the distributional impacts of carbon policies in the U.S.


Joshua Horton
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Josh Horton conducts research on geoengineering policy and governance issues. Before joining the Belfer Center, Josh worked as an energy consultant for a global consulting firm. He holds a PhD in political science from Johns Hopkins University.


Junling Huang
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Value of emerging battery storage technologies for electricity systems

Junling Huang studies the value of emerging battery storage technologies in enhancing opportunities for electricity systems, with particular focus on the United States and China. The overarching theme for his research is to develop a strategy for developing and deploying a cleaner and more efficient electricity system. Junling Huang received his PhD from Harvard University in 2014 and a BS from Peking University in 2009.

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Stuart Iler
HEEP Pre-Doctoral Fellow
PhD Student in Public Policy

Stuart is interested in environmental and energy economics and policy, and in particular the design and evaluation of policies to promote renewable energy and energy efficiency. His previous research includes the impact of climate regulation in the electric power sector, potential reform of the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard, and comparative evaluation of global energy modeling projections. Stuart has worked as a research analyst at the Duke University Energy Initiative and as a policy analyst at the DC think tank, Bipartisan Policy Center. He also has a variety of experience in the information technology industry. Stuart graduated with a BS in Computer Science from the University of California at San Diego, and earned a Master of Environmental Management from Duke University.

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Mehul Jain
Center for Public Leadership Fellow, Harvard Kennedy School

Mehul Jain is a graduate of the Environmental Engineering Program from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Over the past four years of his career he has worked on issues of policy, governance, environment, education and development with the World Bank, particularly focusing his attention to the National Ganga River Basin Clean-up project in India. Leveraging his experience in the development sector, Mehul has also advised politicians from Haryana, Rajasthan, Bihar and Uttar Pradesh. Making development the centerpiece of election campaigns he has been able to provide strategic insight to the associated political parties. These engagements have also allowed him to advise and run effective social media campaigns for the parties. A couple of these campaigns have been lauded as the most successful election campaigns in India. In the past, Mehul has also consulted for organizations such as CSE, TERI, PATH and UNICEF. He is currently pursuing the MPA/ID program at the Kennedy School.

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Ajinkya Shrish Kamat
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Science Technology and Public Policy Program/Innovation and Policy Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Ajinkya Kamat is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Belfer Center's Science Technology and Public Policy Program's Technology & Innovation project. He earned his PhD in physics from the University of Virginia in May 2015. Ajinkya also holds an M.Sc. in physics from Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India and a BSc. in physics from the University of Mumbai, India, where he secured the top rank at the university.


Melissa Kemp
National Science Foundation Environmental Fellow, 2015-2017

Melissa Kemp is an evolutionary biologist who uses the fossil record and historical data to investigate species responses to global change phenomena.
Melissa earned her BA in biology from Williams College in 2010 and her PhD in biology from Stanford University in 2015. At Stanford, she studied the phylogeography of Indo-Pacific clownfish and the population genetics of chorus frogs. Her doctoral dissertation assessed the impact of environmental perturbations on the ecology and evolution of Caribbean lizards at three scales: (1) the regional scale, by evaluating and modeling extinction processes; (2) the community scale, by elucidating the interplay of species richness and species abundance over time; and (3) the species-scale, by assessing genetic responses to biotic and abiotic perturbations.

As an Environmental Fellow, Melissa will work with Jonathan Losos of the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology to investigate how past global change forces have altered species distributions in Anolis lizards. This will reveal population trajectories before, during, and after environmental perturbations are encountered, and provide a framework for evaluating future range shifts.


Shefali Khanna
HEEP Pre-Doctoral Fellow
PhD Student in Public Policy

Shefali’s interests lie at the intersection of environmental policy and energy sector development in emerging economies, specifically on the role of renewable energy and energy efficiency incentives in expanding energy access and improving reliability. She graduated from the University of Maryland, College Park, with a BA in Economics and spent two years working as a research assistant at Resources for the Future, where her research focused on residential energy efficiency and vehicle fuel economy standards in the U.S. She also assisted the World Bank in updating its protocol for estimating global health damages from ambient air pollution.

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Carolina Lembo
Research Fellow, Harvard Electricity Policy Group, Mossavar Rahmani Center for Business and Government, Harvard Kennedy School
Research topic: Electricity access and market design in developing countries

Carolina Lembo's research interests are energy regulation, sustainable development and climate change negotiations. She holds a PhD in International Law from the University of São Paulo, an LLM in International Economic Law and Policy from the University of Barcelona and an MS in State Law from the University of São Paulo. Previously she has been working as a manager of the Infrastructure Department of the Federation of Industries of the State of São Paulo, the major industry chamber in Brazil, where she managed a multidisciplinary infrastructure department with focus on domestic policy and international projects, writing white papers, coordinating publications and organizing conferences with the Brazilian government and international organizations.


Jing Li
HEEP Pre-Doctoral Fellow
PhD Student in Economics

Jing's research is focused in industrial organization and environmental economics. Jing's current projects are on network effects in the adoption of electric vehicles and on biofuel regulation. Jing graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2011 with a BS in Economics and a BS in Mathematics and Computer Science.


Zhang Li
Predoctoral Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Research and innovation policy

Zhang Li is a predoctoral research fellow in the Belfer Center's Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program and Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group. His research interests focus on research and innovation policy, including R&D collaboration, public opinion on emerging technologies, and the policy learning process.
Zhang is a PhD candidate at the School of Public Policy and Management in Tsinghua University, China. He received his undergraduate degree in the Department of Hydraulic Engineering in Tsinghua University.


Zhenyu Li
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Science,Technology, and Public Policy Program/Water-Energy Nexus Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Application of innovative membrane technology and renewable energy for water desalination and reuse

Dr. Zhenyu Li is a postdoctoral research fellow for Water-Energy Nexus project in the Belfer Center's Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program. Before joining the Belfer Center, Zhenyu was a research scientist in Water Desalination and Reuse Center at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia.

His research focuses on the application of innovative membrane technology and renewable energy for water desalination and reuse. He holds a PhD in biotechnology from Prince of Songkla University, Thailand.

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Daniel Madigan
French Environmental Fellow, 2015-2017

Dan Madigan is a marine ecologist interested in the interaction between pelagic ecology, contaminant transfer in food webs, fisheries, and anthropogenic environmental change.
Dan earned a BA in biology from Dartmouth College in 2005 and a PhD in biology from Stanford University in 2013. He has conducted fieldwork in Costa Rica, Jamaica, The Bahamas, Mexico, Alaska, Taiwan, and Japan. His dissertation research was based on elucidating the ecology and migratory dynamics of wide-ranging pelagic species such as tunas and sharks in the Pacific Ocean. His research has utilized stable isotope analysis, amino acid compound-specific stable isotope analysis, and Fukushima-derived radionuclides to assess trophic linkages in the California Current and the migratory dynamics of overfished Pacific bluefin tuna; his work using radionuclides in Pacific bluefin was awarded ASLO’s Lindeman award in 2014. From 2013-2015, Dan worked as an NSF Post-Doctoral Fellow, expanding his work to include mercury in collaboration with Stony Brook University, NOAA, and University of Hawaii.

As a HUCE Environmental Fellow, Dan will work with Elsie Sunderland of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and James McCarthy of the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology. His work at HUCE will focus on understanding the impacts of changing contaminant levels in the environment on the overall health of global fisheries. Dan will be part of an inter-disciplinary team that also includes researchers at MIT and UBC to combine contaminant emissions, atmospheric and ocean transport, ocean ecology, and fisheries dynamics into a single “unified global model” that assesses the present and future effects of contaminants on global fisheries.


Laura J. Martin
Ziff Environmental Fellow, 2015-2017

Laura Jane Martin is a historian and ecologist who studies the cultural and political dimensions of ecological management.

Laura earned an ScB in biophysics from Brown University in 2006, an M.S. in natural resources from Cornell University in 2010, and a PhD in natural resources from Cornell in 2015. While at Cornell, she received national fellowships in both the sciences and the humanities. Through fieldwork, she studied the impact of human activities on the ecology and evolution of wetland species, publishing in Journal of Ecology, Conservation Biology, Trends in Ecology and the Environment, and elsewhere. Through archival research, she investigated the history of ecological restoration in the 20th century United States. Her current work is situated at the nexus of environmental history and science & technology studies.

As an Environmental Fellow, Laura will work with Peter Galison from the Department of the History of Science. She plans to develop her dissertation research into a book that explores how ecological restoration became such a widespread and important environmental practice. She will also begin a project on the use of counter-terrorism technologies for international biodiversity protection. By fostering conversations among scientists and humanists, Laura hopes to generate research that can guide 21st century environmental management.

Leonardo Maugeri
Senior Fellow, Geopolitics of Energy Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Leonardo Maugeri is currently a Senior Fellow with the Geopolitics of Energy Project and the Environment and Natural Resources Program at the Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.


One of the world's foremost experts on oil, gas, and energy, Maugeri has been one of the most distinguished top managers of Eni, the largest Italian company, which is also ranked number 6 among the largest international oil companies. At Eni, he held the position of Senior Executive Vice President of Strategies and Development (2000–2010) and eventually became Executive Chairman of Polimeri Europa, Eni's petrochemical branch (March 2010–June 2011). In 2008, Maugeri promoted the strategic alliance between Eni and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), which—among other outcomes—led to the establishment of the Eni-MIT Solar Frontiers Center in 2010.


Nathaniel Mueller
National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow
Research Topic: Statistical modeling of the relationship of climate and crop yield

Nathan Mueller is an applied ecologist who studies how agricultural systems influence – and are influenced by – global environmental change.

During his two-year fellowship, Nathan is working with Peter Huybers of the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and Noel Michele Holbrook of the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology to improve statistical models relating climate to crop yield. His work also investigates the interaction between changing agricultural management practices and climate using recently compiled time-series data.

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Janhavi Nilekani 
Giorgio Ruffolo Doctoral Research Fellow, Fellow, Sustainability Science Program, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, Harvard Kennedy School
Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD Student in Public Policy

Janhavi Nilekani is a Giorgio Ruffolo Doctoral Research Fellow in the Sustainability Science Program and a doctoral candidate in the Public Policy Program at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Her research focuses on evaluating the relative costs and benefits of different policy instruments for controlling environmental pollution, with an emphasis on India. Janhavi is contributing to collaborative work by the Initiative on Building Public-Private Partnerships to Promote Sustainable Development in India led by Professor Rohini Pande. Janhavi received her BA, cum laude, in economics and international studies and the Ronald Meltzer/Cornelia Awdziewicz Economic Award from Yale University in 2010. She has worked as a research associate on a pilot emissions trading program for Indian industry at the Jameel Poverty Action Lab-South Asia (2011-2012). Her faculty host is Rohini Pande.

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Jisung Park
Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD Student in Economics

Jisung Park is a PhD candidate in the economics department at Harvard University, where he specializes in environmental economics, public, and labor economics. His research focuses on how climate change may affect human development, including labor productivity and human capital impacts of heat stress.

Jisung is also an economics and public service tutor at Eliot House, one of Harvard's undergraduate houses, and teaches Principles of Economics (Ec-10) with Greg Mankiw, as well as American Economic Policy (Ec-1420) with Martin Feldstein, Larry Summers, and Jeff Liebman. He has also taught Environmental Economics (Ec-1661) with Robert Stavins.
A native of Lawrence, Kansas, and Seoul, South Korea, he received his undergraduate education in economics and political science from Columbia University ('09), and attended Oxford for two successive Masters programs in Environmental Change and Management (’10) and Development Economics (’11) on a Rhodes Scholarship (New York District, 2009).


Ari Peskoe
Senior Fellow, Electricity Law, Environmental Policy Initiative, HLS
Research Topic: State implementation of EPA’s Clean Power Plan, Constitutional challenges to states’ energy laws, and regulation of public utilities

Ari Peskoe is the Senior Fellow in Electricity Law at the Policy Initiative. He currently focuses on state implementation of the EPA’s Clean Power Plan. Prior to the Policy Initiative, Ari was an associate at a law firm in Washington, DC, where he litigated before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission about the western energy crisis. He received his JD from Harvard Law School and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with degrees in electrical engineering and business.


Daniel Poneman
Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Daniel Poneman is a Senior Fellow with the Belfer Center. Prior to his appointment in October 2014, Poneman had been Deputy Secretary of Energy since 2009, in which capacity he also served as Chief Operating Officer of the Department. Between April 23, 2013, and May 21, 2013, Poneman served as Acting Secretary of Energy.

Poneman's responsibilities at the Department of Energy spanned the full range of President Obama’s all-of-the-above energy strategy, including fossil and nuclear energy, renewables and energy efficiency, and international cooperation around the world. He led 2009 negotiations to address Iran’s nuclear program and participated in the Deputies' Committee at the National Security Council. He played an instrumental role in the Department’s response to crises from Fukushima to the Libyan civil war to Hurricane Sandy, and led the Department’s efforts to strengthen emergency response and cybersecurity across the energy sector.

Poneman first joined the Department of Energy in 1989 as a White House Fellow. The next year he joined the National Security Council staff as Director of Defense Policy and Arms Control. From 1993 through 1996, Poneman served as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Nonproliferation and Export Controls at the National Security Council. Prior to assuming his responsibilities as Deputy Secretary, Poneman served as a principal of The Scowcroft Group for eight years, providing strategic advice to corporations on a wide variety of international projects and transactions. Between tours of government service, he practiced law for nine years in Washington, D.C. – first as an associate at Covington & Burling, later as a partner at Hogan & Hartson.

Poneman received AB and JD degrees with honors from Harvard University and an MLitt in Politics from Oxford University. He has published widely on energy and national security issues and is the author of Nuclear Power in the Developing World and Argentina: Democracy on Trial. His third book, Going Critical: The First North Korean Nuclear Crisis (coauthored with Joel Wit and Robert Gallucci), received the 2005 Douglas Dillon Award for Distinguished Writing on American Diplomacy. Poneman is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
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Cristine Russell
Senior Fellow, Environment and Natural Resources Program & Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy
Research Topic: The future of science writing and how to improve news media coverage of controversial science, environment, energy and health issues.

Cristine Russell is an award-winning freelance journalist who has written about science, health, and the environment for more than three decades. She was a former national science reporter for The Washington Post and The Washington Star and currently writes for publications such as Columbia Journalism Review. She is the immediate past President of the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing, and a past president of the National Association of Science Writers. She is an honorary member of Sigma Xi, the scientific research society, and has a biology degree from Mills College. She was a Spring 2006 Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics, and Public Policy and teaches a Harvard Kennedy School class on “Controversies in Climate, Energy and the Media.” Her research focuses on the future of science writing and how to improve news media coverage of controversial scientific issues. She is organizing workshops for reporters and scientists and planning a book on current controversies in science, health, and the environment.

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Trisha Shrum
Fellow, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
PhD Student in Public Policy

Trisha Shrum's research interests include climate change and energy policy as seen through the disciplinary lenses of environmental and behavioral economics. Her dissertation work uses behavioral experiments to better understand how people incorporate and utilize information to make economic decisions on energy consumption and climate change mitigation. She graduated from the University of Kansas with bachelor's degrees in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Science and with a minor in Economics. She went on to work on climate change and energy policy as a research fellow at the Kansas Energy Council and earned her Master’s in Environmental Science from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.


Afreen Siddiqi
Visiting Scholar, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Linkages between water, energy, and food security

Dr. Afreen Siddiqi is a visiting scholar with the Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program at Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. She is also as a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Her research expertise is at the intersection of technology, policy, and international development. She combines quantitative tools and qualitative methods for complex socio-technical systems analysis. Her work includes a focus on investigating how water and agriculture sectors impact energy consumption and implications for energy policy. She is examining critical linkages between water, energy, and food security at urban, provincial, and national scales in the Middle East and North Africa, and analyzing the hydro-power portfolio in the Indus basin of Pakistan.

Dr. Siddiqi has an SB in Mechanical Engineering and an SM and PhD in Aerospace Systems, all from MIT. She has been a recipient of the Amelia Earhart Fellowship, Richard D. DuPont Fellowship, and the Rene H. Miller Prize in Systems Engineering. She has engineering experience in National Instruments (in Austin, Texas) and Schlumberger (in Houston, Texas), consulting experience with BP, Lockheed Martin, and Aurora Flight Systems, and teaching experience at MIT and Universita della Svizzera italiana in Switzerland.

Karoline Steinbacher
Giorgio Ruffolo Doctoral Research Fellow in Sustainability Science, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Policies for renewable energy, the political economy of energy transitions in developing and industrialized countries, and European energy and climate policy

Karoline Steinbacher is a joint Giorgio Ruffolo Doctoral Research Fellow in the Sustainability Science Program and the Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group. Her doctoral dissertation at FU Berlin examines policy transfer from the German "Energiewende" to Morocco, South Africa, and California.

Karoline's research interests include policies for renewable energy, the political economy of energy transitions in developing and industrialized countries, and European energy and climate policy. She earned a MA, summa cum laude, in international economic policy from SciencesPo Paris and gained professional experience as a junior expert in gas market regulation at E-Control, and as an energy policy consultant for GIZ, the German agency for international cooperation.


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Rebecca Stern is a research fellow in the Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program's Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group. Broadly, her research interests revolve around the intersection of science and policymaking, with a focus on clean energy, climate change, and environmental toxins and include the role of university-industry partnerships in facilitating science, technology, and innovation in the Gulf Arab states.
Prior to joining the Belfer Center, Rebecca was Assistant Vice President at an asset management firm in New York. She has previously published work examining the toxicity of plastics additives and the molecular design of safer alternatives to endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

Rebecca graduated with a double major in Environmental Studies and Political Science from Yale University in 2012.


Samuel Stolper
HEEP Pre-Doctoral Fellow
PhD Student in Public Policy
Research Topic: Distributional impacts of energy taxation

Sam is interested in measuring the costs and benefits of a variety of environmental problems and policies – especially those pertaining to climate change. In his job market research, he estimates the local price impacts of automotive fuel taxes and shows how such price impacts can affect the distributional equity of energy policy. He is also conducting research on water pollution, regulation, and health in India. Sam has taught "economic analysis of public policy" to Master’s students and "economics of climate change" to undergraduates while at Harvard. His past work includes stints at The World Bank, Resources for the Future, and Harvard's Center for International Development. He currently writes blog articles at Sense & Sustainability.

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Behnam Taebi
Research Fellow, Project on Managing the Atom/International Security Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Nuclear ethics and responsible innovation

Behnam Taebi is a research fellow in the Belfer Center's Project on Managing the Atom and International Security Program. He studied material science and engineering (2006) and received his PhD in philosophy of technology from Delft University of Technology (The Netherlands, 2010). His main research interests lie in nuclear ethics and responsible innovation. He is the leading editor of a volume on The Ethics of Nuclear Energy (Cambridge University Press) and of a special issue of Journal of Risk Research on "The Socio-technical Challenges of Nuclear Power Production and Waste Management in the Post-Fukushima Era." He is an assistant professor of philosophy of technology at the Faculty of Technology, Policy, and Management at Delft University, spending a sabbatical year as a research fellow at the Belfer Center.


Xianchun Tan
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research topic: Low-carbon development strategies, policies, and planning

Xianchun Tan is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs' Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group and a professor in low-carbon economy at the Institute of Policy and Management, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Her research interests include low-carbon development strategies, policies, and planning. She has published several articles and received three prizes on those subjects. She received her PhD from Chongqing University, China, and she was a postdoctoral fellow at Tsinghua University in management science and engineering. She plans to research the analysis of carbon emission trends in both China and the United States during her fellowship.


Shauna B. Theel
Louis M. Bacon Environmental Leadership Fellow, Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School

Shauna B. Theel has worked over the last several years in media positions in the energy space. First, as Climate and Energy Program Director at Media Matters for America, a not-for-profit, web-based media watchdog, Shauna was editor for all energy and environment work and managed long term projects capturing data on the amount and nature of media coverage on climate change and clean energy. The first action of the Senate Climate Action task force was to take a study she had overseen on climate coverage to the broadcast networks, which then covered climate change more in one Sunday show than they had in the last three years of Sunday shows. After this position, she served as Deputy Director, Digital Media at American Wind Energy Association, the trade association for the U.S. wind industry. In this position, she coordinated blogs, op-eds, letters to the editor and developed the organization’s social media strategy and outreach plan. She graduated magna cum laude from the University of California, Berkeley.


Chengchuan Tian
China Environmental Sustainability Fellow, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

TIAN Chengchuan is a research fellow in the Belfer Center's China Environmental Sustainability Fellows Program and a postdoctoral fellow in Applied Economics at Peking University. His doctoral dissertation is about globalization and China's government economic management. He is director of the Division of Strategic Research and Planning, Department of Climate Change, National Development and Reform Commission, and he has been engaged in strategic planning and policy research on climate change for many years.


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Natalie Unterstell
Louis M. Bacon Environmental Leadership Fellow, Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School

Natalie Unterstell is an experienced environment and climate change professional from Brazil. She is currently a Louis M. Bacon Environmental Leadership fellow in the Center of Public Leadership at Harvard. Natalie holds a Bachelor’ degree in Business Administration from Fundacao Getulio Vargas (2004) in Brazil and she is a Master on Public Administration candidate at Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Natalie has worked in the Secretariat of Strategic Affairs of the Brazilian Presidency, in the Brazilian Ministry of the Environment, in the Government of Amazonas and in the Instituto Socioambiental. She has been a negotiator on behalf of the Government of Brazil in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and acted as a civil society observer to negotiations before that. She was the lead negotiator on REDD+ and also member of the BASIC Experts (Brazil, South Africa, India and China) group. Her research work deals with the economic analysis of climate change impacts and related adaptation strategies.


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Pu Wang
Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Sustainability Science, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Cap and trade systems for greenhouse gas emissions in China and China-US cooperation on climate change policies

Pu Wang received his PhD degree from Cornell University in 2014, in the field of natural resources. His research is motivated by the great potential of market-based environmental policies in addressing social and environmental challenges associated with climate change. In particular, he is interested in the application of market-based policies in the context of socioeconomic inequalities.

As a ETIP postdoctoral fellow, his research focuses on cap and trade systems for greenhouse-gas emissions in China and China-U.S. cooperation in climate change policies.


David M. Wight
Ernest May Fellow in History and Policy, International Security Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: Oil money: How petrodollars transformed US-Middle East relations, 1967-1986”

David Wight is a scholar of the history of U.S. foreign relations, the modern Middle East and North Africa, global political economy, and transnational exchange. During his time at the Belfer Center, he is researching and writing a book manuscript titled, "Oil Money: How Petrodollars Transformed US-Middle East Relations, 1967–1986," based on newly available governmental and nongovernmental sources and English and Arabic language media. He earned his PhD in History from the University of California, Irvine.

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Kaho Yu
Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Geopolitics of Energy Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Research Topic: China’s gas expansion, the eastward shift of Russian energy strategy, and the geopolitical implications for the Asia-Pacific region

Kaho Yu is a post-doctoral fellow with the Geopolitics of Energy Project at Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center. Kaho’s research focuses on the geopolitics of China’s energy security, “Belt and Road Initiative”, Sino-Russian energy cooperation, and China’s role in global energy governance. In particular, his research at Harvard seeks to understand the development of China’s gas expansion under the framework of President Xi Jinping’s “Belt and Road Initiative,” the eastward shift of Russian energy strategy, and the geopolitical implications for Asia-Pacific. In addition to his appointment at Harvard, Kaho serves as a Research Fellow at the Center for International Energy Security Studies at Chinese Academy of Social Science, European Center for Energy and Resources Security at King’s College London, Renmin University Chongyang Institute and Asian Energy Studies Centre at Hong Kong Baptist University. Since 2013, he has been teaching a master course on Geopolitics of Energy at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is now finishing his PhD at King’s College London and the thesis topic is “From energy diplomacy to global governance: A case study on China’s energy security in the 21st century.” In addition, Kaho observes Chinese energy policy and Eurasian energy geopolitics closely and regularly produces energy strategy reports in both Chinese and English. He is also one of the authors of the Blue Book of World Energy of the Chinese Academy of Social Science.

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Yige Zhang
Ziff Environmental Fellow, Harvard University Center for the Environment
Research Topic: Resolving the late Miocene CO2 climate sensitivity “paradox” using biomarkers and their stable isotopes

Yige Zhang is a geochemist interested in understanding how the Earth evolved chemically, and using various geochemical tools to study climate change of the geological past.
Yige earned his BS in geochemistry at Nanjing University, China (2007), a MS in Marine Sciences from the University of Georgia in 2009. His MPhil (2011) and PhD (2014) in Geology and Geophysics are from Yale University. During his PhD, his research is focused on climate reconstructions and modeling of the Cenozoic greenhouse – icehouse transition, including the Oligocene, Miocene and Pliocene epochs. He used geochemical proxies from marine sediments to understand ocean temperatures, atmospheric CO2 levels and continental ice volume over a series of global climate change events.

As an Environmental Fellow, Yige will be working with Ann Pearson from the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences. He plans to develop improved atmospheric CO2 estimates in the Miocene, using organic geochemistry methodologies and novel approaches to isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. His goal is to resolve the Miocene CO2 climate sensitivity “paradox,” an issue confronting his field in which current reconstructions show a puzzling relationship between stable, or even increased, CO2 concentrations during substantial surface seawater cooling. Yige hopes to resolve this climate sensitivity puzzle, which currently suggests that CO2 either played a minor role or that our proxy methods for measuring CO2 levels during that period are flawed.

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