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Photos:
copyright Siddharth Kara
  All rights reserved.


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Event Details:

“Online Conference: Best Practices to Combat Human Trafficking: Trafficking in Disaster Zones”
Monday, May 24, 2010
2:00 - 4:00 pm
ONLINE

Haiti

Online Conference:

Best Practices
to
Combat Trafficking:

Trafficking
in Disaster Zones





special keynote address by

Ambassador Luis CdeBaca
Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons,
U.S. State Department

featuring

Marisa Ferri
Program Officer, Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons,
U.S. State Department,

Jean-Robert Cadet
Author of Restavec and International Child Advocate,

Susan Martin, Ph.D
Donald G. Herzberg Chair in International Migration and Director,
Institute for the Study of International Migration, Georgetown University

and moderated by

Karen McLaughlin
Director of Public Policy,
International Organization for Victim Assistance (IOVA)

Co-sponsonsored with:
the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, U.S. State Department
and
the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School

In the light of the recent earthquake in Haiti, human trafficking has risen to the forefront of global news reports as well as in public policy discourse. Over the course of the last decade, natural disasters have occurred in varying size and scope leaving many populations increasingly vulnerable to traffickers. Disasters create catastrophic circumstances of chaos, disorganization, and destruction for predatory opportunists to capitalize on these cataclysmic situations.

What can be done to prevent human trafficking of vulnerable populations during a disaster? This online conference will focus on the best practices to combat trafficking in the wake of natural disasters or other events involving mass casualties. Ambassador Luis CdeBaca of the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, U.S. State Department, will keynote this special discussion.

The discussion, moderated by Karen McLaughlin, Director of Public Policy, International Organization for Victim Assistance (IOVA), will also feature:

Marisa Ferri, Program Officer, Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, U.S. State Department,

Jean-Robert Cadet, Author of Restavec and International Child Advocate,

Susan Martin, Ph.D., Donald G. Herzberg Chair in International Migration and Director, Institute for the Study of International Migration, Georgetown University.

More information can be found on the conference registration page.


Event Follow-up:

A recording of the webinar and its associated slides is now available at:
     http://www.innovations.harvard.edu/xchat-transcript.html?chid=346

Accessing the Conference Recording: To access the conference archive, you must first register at the Ash Institute's online conference web site. Registration is free and takes only a few seconds. Anyone who registered and/or attended the original on-line event does not need to reregister.


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Please Note: The information contained in the live lectures and webinar presentations posted at this site do not necessarily represent the views of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School, or Harvard University. Lectures and presentations represent a diversity of viewpoints and research. These lectures and webinar presentations are for educational purposes only. The Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, Harvard Kennedy School, and Harvard University are not responsible for any content included in the lectures and webinar presentations, and these materials may not be reproduced without written permission.
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